The Worst Sentence Ever Written: 2014

atkins-bookshelf-literatureThe Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest (BLFC), established in 1982 by English Professor Scott Rice at San Jose State University, recognizes the worst opening sentence (also known as an “incipit”) for a novel. The name of the quasi-literary contest honors Edward George Bulwer Lytton, author of a very obscure 1830 Victorian novel, Paul Clifford, with a very famous opening sentence: “It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents—except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the housetops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness.” 

Each year, contest receives more than 10,000 entries from all over the world — proving that there is no shortage of wretched writers vying for acclaim. The contest now has several subcategories, including adventure, crime, romance, and detective fiction. The winner gets bragging rights for writing the worst sentence of the year and a modest financial award of $150 — presumably for writing lessons.

The winner of the 2014 BLFC was Elizabeth Dorfman of Bainbridge Island, Washington who submitted this terrible opening sentence:
“When the dead moose floated into view the famished crew cheered — this had to mean land! — but Captain Walgrove, flinty-eyed and clear-headed thanks to the starvation cleanse in progress, gave fateful orders to remain on the original course and await the appearance of a second and confirming moose.”

In the category of Vile Puns, Howie McLennon of Ottawa, Ontario inflicted this punny sentence upon the world: 
“Pet detective Drake Leghorn ducked reporters at the entrance to the small hobby farm and headed down to the tiny pond where a lone goose was frantically calling for her mate and wondered why — when so many come to look upon the graceful mating pair — why would someone want to take a gander?”

Read related posts: The Worst Sentence Ever Written
The Best Sentences in English Literature
Best Books for Word Lovers
Best Books for Writers
Most Famous Quotations in British Literature

For futher reading: bulwer-lytton.com/2014win.html
Dark and Stormy Rides Again by Scott Rice, Penguin Books (1996)

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