The Age of Wisdom, the Age of Foolishness

atkins-bookshelf-quotationsIt was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way — in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

One of the most famous opening paragraphs in literature, from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. Dickens was writing in 1859, a period of unrest preceding the French revolution, but it could easily apply to the modern world — the so-called Google Generation — walking the tightrope between wisdom (a vast ocean of information) and folly (getting lost, or worse — drowning, in that vast sea).

Read related posts: A Mind is a Terrible Thing to Waste 
The Google Generation: Reduced to Passivity and Egoism?
Impact of Smart Phones on Society
Why Read Dickens?
The World’s Most Voracious Readers
The Impact of Mobile Technology

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