Words Invented by Book Lovers

atkins bookshelf wordsPowell’s Books, located in Portland Oregon, is the largest independent bookstore in the world. The store, founded in 1971 by Walter Powell, occupies an entire city block, containing 70,000 square feet of retail floor space, with an inventory of more than one million new, used, and rare books. Its nickname is very appropriate: the City of Books. In short, this store is every bibliophile’s idea of heaven. Powell’s Books owns five locations, that combined have an inventory of over four million books.

But Powell’s offers more than just an incredible selection of books on its website. If you happen to stumble upon it, the bookstore’s blog features a real treasure: Readerly Terms. Readerly Terms are witty made-up words (neologisms, to be precise) and phrases related to reading that are submitted by book lovers. Here are some selections that every book lover should know:

Ambuliterate: proficient in the act of reading while walking.

Fictionanigans: acts of mischief so well executed that they could only have been performed by fictional characters.

Biblio sapiens: a species characterized by complex thinking and an advanced love of books.

Printerior decoration: markings or doodles found inside a used book.

Proseur: one who reads books, or pretends to read books, for appearance’s sake.

Readirect: to constantly bring a conversation back to the books one is reading.

Ubookquitous: pertaining to a book one seems to encounter everywhere.

Wordigo: the feeling of sissiness brought on by the complexity of an author’s prose.

Worm’s eye view: an intimate and detailed understanding of a book’s contents.

Read related posts: What is a Collocation?
What is the Longest Word in English Language?
Word Oddities: Fun with Vowels

What is an Abecedarian Insult?
Difficult Tongue Twisters
Rare Anatomy Words
What Rhymes with Orange?

For further reading: http://www.powells.com/blog/category/readerly-terms
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-amazon-bookstore-20160212-story.html

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