The Unwritten Rules of the Internet

alex atkins bookshelf phrasesBack in 2002, there were about 569 million internet users (9.1% of the world’s population). In a decade that number shot up to an astounding 2.27 billion (33% of the world’s population). With that many people using the internet, and since human beings are creatures of habit, what sort of behaviors or patterns emerge with respect to digital dialogue? Excellent question. If you have spent enough time reading posts in the comments section and FAQs these patterns of behavior will emerge. Eventually, because they are so self-evident, these behaviors acquire a specific name, entering the lexicon of “unwritten rules” or “unwritten laws.” They join the classics, like Parkinson’s Law (work expands to fill the time available for its completion) or Murphy’s Law (anything that can go wrong will go wrong). Here are some of the most common unwritten rules of the internet:

Armstrong’s Law: When discussions between Americans and non Americans about a variety of topics, where America is not the greatest at said topic, the likelihood of the American arbitrarily bringing up the U.S. moon landings increases dramatically. (Named after astronaut Neil Armstrong, first man to set foot on the moon.)

Cunningham’s Law: the best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question — it’s to post the wrong answer. (Attributed to Ward Cunningham)

Godwin’s Law: As an online discussion grows longer, eventually someone will make a comparison involving Hitler or his deeds. (Coined by Mike Godwin)

Muphry’s Law: If you write anything criticizing editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written. (And no, this is not a typo: Murphy is misspelled deliberately). (Coined by John Bangsund).

Poe’s Law: Without a winking smiley or other blatant display of humor, it is utterly impossible to parody a Creationist in such a way that someone won’t mistake for the genuine article. (Coined by Nathan Poe)

Streisand Effect: an attempt to remove or censor information on the internet has the unintended consequence of bringing more attention to that information. (Named after Barbara Streisand who was trying to suppress aerial photos of her house in Malibu in 2003).

Wadsworth Constant: The first 30% of any video can be skipped because it contains no worthwhile or interesting information. (Coined by a Reddit editor named Wadsworth.)

Read related posts: Godwin’s Law
Unwritten Rules of Life
What is the Barnum Effect?
What is the Pinocchio Effect?

For further reading: urbandictionary.com
http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-internet-a-decade-later-infographic
https://iampuzzlr.deviantart.com
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponymous_laws

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