There’s a Word for That: Macroverbumsciolist

atkins-bookshelf-wordsA macroverbumsciolist is a person who is ignorant of large words or who pretends to know what a word means. Is considered a nonce word, i.e., a word that was coined for a particular occasion or use that is not expected to occur again. Nonce words are generally not found in conventional dictionaries. The word is derived from the Greek macro, “large” and Latin verbum, “word” and the Late Latin sciolus, “smatterer, pretender of knowledge” (diminutive of scius, “knowing”).

Related words: dabbler, dilettante, ultracrepidarian

Read related posts: There’s a Word for That: Esprit de l’escalier
There’s a Word for That: Jouissance
There’s a Word for That: Abibliophobia
There’s a Word for That: Petrichor
There’s a Word for That: Deipnosophist
There’s a Word for That: Pareidolia
There’s a Word for That: Macroverbumsciolist

For further reading: Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition edited by John Simpson and Edmund Weiner, Oxford University Press (1991). http://www.urbandictionary.com.

Emacity

Definition: Noun. The desire or fondness for buying things, or more generally for spending money.

Etymology: From the Latin emaciates, “the desire to buy.”

Related words: shopaholic, conspicuous consumer

From the Urban Dictionary:
Shopping: buying a whole lot of stuff that you don’t really need.
Shoplete: one who shops for sport

For further reading: Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition edited by John Simpson and Edmund Weiner, Oxford University Press (1991). http://www.urbandictionary.com.

There’s a Word for That: Esprit de l’escalier

Definition: Noun. The witty remark you wish you had made.

Pronounced: (es-PREED les-kah-LYAY)

Etymology: Literally, “staircase wit” from the French esprit meaning “wit” and escalier meaning “stairs.” The phrase was coined by philosopher and encyclopedist Denis Diderot in his essay, Paradoxe Sur le Comédien: “a sensitive man, such as myself, overwhelmed by the argument levelled against him [by statesman Jacques Necker], becomes confused and can only think clearly again [when he reaches] the bottom of the stairs.” In other words, Diderot did not come up with a witty comeback until he reached the bottom of the stairs, too late to make an impact on the conversation.

Variants: l’esprit de l’escalier (lay SPREED les-kah-LYAY)
esprit d’escalier (es-PREED des-kah-LYAY)

There’s a Word for That: Jouissance
There’s a Word for That: Abibliophobia
There’s a Word for That: Petrichor
There’s a Word for That: Deipnosophist

For further reading: Les Bons Mots: How to Amaze Tout le Mond with Everyday French by Eugene Ehrlich, Henry Holt (1997). http://www.merriam-webster.com 

Ineffable

Definition: Adjective. Something that is so great or wonderful that it cannot be described with words.

Etymology: From the Latin ineffabilis meaning “unutterable;” lietrally, “not speakable from in- “not” and effabilis “speakable.”

Related words: ineffably (adverb) and ineffability (noun).

For further reading: Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition edited by John Simpson and Edmund Weiner, Oxford University Press (1991).

There’s a Word for That: Cacology

atkins-bookshelf-wordsCacology, an ugly sounding word, is a poor choice of words or very bad pronunciation. The word is derived from the Greek kakologia meaning “evil speaking” or “abusive language” and kakos meaning “bad.

Related word: Cacography, bad writing or bad handwriting.

Read related posts: There’s a Word for That: Esprit de l’escalier
There’s a Word for That: Jouissance
There’s a Word for That: Abibliophobia
There’s a Word for That: Petrichor
There’s a Word for That: Deipnosophist
There’s a Word for That: Pareidolia

There’s a Word for That: Macroverbumsciolist
There’s a Word for That: Ultracrepidarian

For further reading: Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition edited by John Simpson and Edmund Weiner, Oxford University Press (1991).