Tag Archives: why did king write letter from birmingham

We Must Repent for the Hateful Actions of Bad People and the Appalling Silence of Good People

alex atkins bookshelf quotations“We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people. Human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability; it comes through the tireless efforts of men willing to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work, time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use time creatively, in the knowledge that the time is always ripe to do right. Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform our pending national elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.”

From Letter from a Birmingham Jail (April 16, 1963) by Martin Luther King, Jr. The open letter, written while King was incarcerated at the Birmingham, Alabama jail, was his response to a statement (titled “A Call for Unity”) by eight white clergymen from the area who criticized his participation in the widely publicized civil right demonstrations in their state. The nonviolent campaign, beginning on April 3, involved coordinated marches and sit-ins against racial segregation and racism. The critics called King “an outsider” and deemed his actions “unwise and untimely.” King quickly dismissed both criticisms: “I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their ‘thus saith the Lord’ far beyond the boundaries of their home towns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid. Moreover, I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. Never again can we afford to live with the narrow, provincial ‘outside agitator’ idea. Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds.”

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